Vintage reverse carved Lucite jewellery.

Vintage 1940s reverse carved rose lucite pendant necklace jewellery

Adorable!

I love vintage reverse carved Lucite jewelry, especially the little brooches from the 1940s and 1950s.  Lucite is a trade name for acrylic thermoplastic (Perspex is another name), and it is a fabulous material which can be melted down and re-used.

As well as being factory made, reverse carving Lucite was a poular home made craft hobby during the mid 20th century.  Morning Glory Antiques has a superb article on how it was created, complete with images of a 1947 magazines step-by-step DIY guide on how to carve the plastic

The reverse carving was finished by painted the inside using acrylic paints, oils or water based colour pigments (which is why you should never get them wet as the paint sometimes dissolves, as early on my my career I found out to my horror!)

Info help and tips on vintage reverse carved Lucite plastic perspex jewelry guide learning

The back of a vintage reverse carved lucite brooch. The hollowed out areas left by the carving would have been carefully painted with colours to create the 3-D effect to the flowers. Notice on this brooch the back hasn’t been varnished nor protected, so water may damage the colour pigments used in the brooch.

Info help and tips on vintage reverse carved Lucite plastic perspex jewellery guide learning

Front of the above vintage reverse carved Lucite brooch. The beveled edge gives a clever illusion of reflection which frames the flowers beautifully.

Info help and tips on vintage reverse carved Lucite plastic perspex jewelry guide learning

Many Lucite brooches were DIY home made projects, using simple carving techniques to create realistic visual effects, such as the red roses in this vintage reverse carved Lucite brooch.

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